Knit Artful Patterns & Designs with Ease

Intarsia Knitting Guide by Rachel

intarsia-knitting

Intarsia Knitting: Dive into Colorful Knitting!

Hey there! I’m Rachel and if there’s one thing I absolutely love, it’s knitting. But not just any knitting – I’m talking about Intarsia knitting! So, what’s the deal with it?

Intarsia knitting is a fabulous method that lets you knit with splashes of colors in different patterns. Unlike the standard fair isle technique, you won’t be dragging unused colors behind your work. This ensures your masterpiece remains evenly thick all over.

Note: While my enthusiasm is free, some of the resources I recommend might come with a tiny kickback to keep me crafting! But don’t sweat, it won’t cost you extra.

Let’s talk more about the fun part: mixing colors! Intarsia knitting is truly an art. But, it’s essential to get the technique right to avoid unwanted gaps when you swap colors. And guess what? You can jazz it up in both stocking stitch and garter stitch. The secret sauce? Twisting your yarns during color transitions to prevent those pesky holes!

A heads-up though: Intarsia doesn’t play well in the round. Your yarn might end up misplaced, leading to a lot of cutting and rejoining. That’s a whole lot of ends to handle!

If you’re just starting, the “Beginners Guide to Intarsia Knitting” by Suzie Johnson is a treasure trove. It’s packed with 96 pages of wisdom. Dive in to discover patterns from starry blankets to foxy cushions.

Feeling a tad overwhelmed? Relax! Remember, at its core, you’re just holding one yarn strand, just like standard knitting. Piece of cake, right?

Now, the yarn-twisting rule for color change is super easy:

  • 1. Hold your departing color to the left.
  • 2. Grasp the incoming color from underneath, on the right side of the old one.
  • 3. Voilà! Start with your new shade.

Ensure you intertwine the yarns on the backside every time you change colors. This tiny step is your guardian against gaps in your piece!

If you’re a visual learner, there are plenty of resources online. Just search for a garter stitch tutorial or chart guides. Protip: If using a chart, photocopying it can be a lifesaver. It lets you magnify for clarity and track your progress with a ruler!

Prepping for Your Intarsia Adventure

Unless you fancy juggling entire yarn balls, consider using a yarn bobbin or even small plastic bags. It’ll require some upfront prep, but trust me, it’ll save you from a tangly nightmare. If bobbins are alien to you, no stress! Just wrap your yarn in an eight-figure around your fingers, snip it, and bag it. As you work, unwind a bit from the bobbin center, staying close to prevent tangles.

Quick tip for estimating yarn amounts:

  • 1. Tally stitches for each color.
  • 2. Loop the yarn around your knitting needle ten times to determine yarn length for ten stitches.
  • 3. Multiply the yarn length by stitch count for the total length.
  • 4. Add a little extra for movement and finishing ends.

Wrap-Up & Fixes

It’s smart to sew in any dangling ends as you progress. Use a tapestry needle to weave in the yarn where colors meet. The aim is to seal gaps without constricting your work. If a tiny error pops up in your intarsia, a Swiss darn can be your savior to fix small color areas.

The intarsia wave is swelling in the fashion world, with new, chic patterns popping up everywhere. If you’re hunting for an exciting project, “Knit Your Story In Yarn” is stellar. From quilts to pillows, there’s a world to explore. I’m stoked to jump in, and I hope you are too!

Got burning questions? Just drop them below!

Key Points Details
What’s Intarsia Knitting? Knitting with multiple colors without carrying unused colors behind the work.
Intarsia vs. In the Round Intarsia doesn’t work well in the round.
Resource Recommendation “Beginners Guide to Intarsia Knitting” by Suzie Johnson.
Yarn Twisting Rule Hold the old color to the left, pick the new color from underneath.
Yarn Preparation Use a yarn bobbin or small bags for organization and ease.


All About Intarsia Knitting

Complement the information with the following video: